An Evening with Mai Neng Moua - November 28th @ 4pm

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Nov. 28: An Evening with Mai Neng Moua

4pm-6pm
Andersen Library room 120

- West Ban


222 21st Ave S, Minneapolis, MN 55455

Asian American Studies invites you to an evening with Mai Neng Moua

Join us for a fish bowl conversation featuring award-winning author Mai Neng Moua, professor of Hmong and Southeast Asian history Dr. Mai Na Lee, and Asian American literature and drama scholar Yuan Ding as they discuss Hmong American histories, cultures, traditions, and the courageous and heartbreaking ways we navigate these age-old issues.

This event is FREE and OPEN TO ALL.

This event is made possible because of generous sponsorship from theImmigration History Research Center, (RIGS) Race, Indigeneity, Gender & Sexuality Studies Initiative - RIGS UMN, the Asian Pacific American Resource Center, the English Department, and a partnership with the Minnesota Historical Society Press

ABOUT THE BOOK
When Mai Neng Moua decides to get married, her mother, a widow, wants the groom to follow Hmong custom and pay a bride price, which both honors the work the bride's family has done in raising a daughter and offers a promise of love and security from the groom's family. Mai Neng, who knows the pain this tradition has caused, says no. Her husband-to-be supports her choice.

What happens next is devastating, and it raises questions about the very meaning of being Hmong in America. The couple refuses to participate in the tshoob, the traditional Hmong marriage ceremony; many members of their families, on both sides, stay away from their church wedding. Months later, the families carry out the tshoob without the wedding couple. But even after the bride price has been paid, Mai Neng finds herself outside of Hmong culture and at odds with her mother, not realizing the full meaning of the customs she has rejected. As she navigates the Hmong world of animism, Christianity, and traditional gender roles, she begins to learn what she has not been taught. Through a trip to Thailand, through hard work in the garden, through the birth of another generation, one strong woman seeks reconciliation with another.

ABOUT MAI NENG MOUA
Mai Neng has been hailed as the mid-wife of the modern Hmong literary movement by The New York Times and is the founder of the first Hmong literary journal Paj Ntaub Voice, among many many more accolades. She recently released her memoir, The Bride Price (MN Historical Society Press) earlier this summer.

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